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CHOWANOKE INDIAN NATION

THE GREAT SPIRIT IS IN ALL THINGS

 

PEOPLE OF THE SOUTH

An Algonquian tribe that thrived in the northeastern section of North Carolina by the end of the middle-sixteenth century, the Chowanoke, also spelled Choanoac, were once the most prominent Algonquians in the area when Europeans explored what they called the New World. The Chowanoke, Algonquian for “people at the south,” lived and settled around the Chowan River and their dominion encompassed the Bertie, Chowan, Gates, and Hertford Counties.
The Chowanoke lived near swamps, rivers, and other tributaries throughout North Carolina. With a focus on fishing and hunting, William S. Powell discusses the importance of communal “hunting quarters.” These lands, near the present North Carolina-Virginia border, were shared and used by the Meherrin, Weapemeoc, Tuscarora, and Chowanoke tribes.

 
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TRIBAL LEADERSHIP

The Chowanoke Indian Tribe of North Carolina is led by a Tribal Council who have been elected by their peers. Members of the Tribal Council, as well as members of its committees, contribute a significant amount of their personal time and effort to look after the well-being of the Chowanoke Community at home and abroad.

THOMAS "TWO FEATHERS" LEWIS

Chowanoke Indian Nation Chief

 

Big Thunder (Bedagi) Algonquinddha

"The Great Spirit is in all things, he is in the air we breathe. The Great Spirit is our Father, but the earth is our Mother. She nourishes us, that which we put into the ground, she returns to us.”

 
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EXPLORE. GIVE. LIVE.

HAPPENINGS

Explore upcoming tribal events including Native American crafts, cultural exhibits, foods, music, pow-wows and more.

DONATE

Helping the Native American families in need with food, clothing and other basic life necessities.

CULTURE

The Chowanoke tribe—an Algonquian people indigenous North Carolina—were people with a rich music culture and history.

The Chowanoke Indian Nation is tax-exempt under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. It is eligible to receive contributions deductible as charitable donations for federal income tax purposes. All donations are tax-deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law. You will receive a tax receipt from Chowanoke Indian Nation

 
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HAPPENINGS

NEWS & EVENTS

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETING

The Tribal Council is committed to providing information of interest to all its members, both on and off the reservation.  To help achieve our communications goals, we host Monthly Meetings every Second Saturday to discuss important issues and other information that may be of interest to Tribal members.

GENERAL BODY MEETING

The General Body Meetings are a mix of mini events and information about what's going on in the Chowanoke Tribal Community.  The General Body Meeting is a great way to make friends, learn about different community and tribal resources, and advocate for the tribal population by making your voice heard.

CHOWANOKE POW-WOW

The Chowanoke Pow-Wows is our way of meeting together, to join in dancing, singing, visiting, renewing old friendships, and making new ones. This is a time to renew our culture and preserve the rich heritage of Chowanole Indians.

$5 Adult Admission

$3 Children/Seniors

GRAND ENTRY

Friday 7 PM

Saturday 12 Noon & 7 PM

Sunday 12 Noon

CHRISTMAS SOCIAL

The Chowanoke Christmas Social is a means of maintaining our cultural and historical integrity by focusing on the "old ways" and mixing Christmas traditions with our native customs such as dances to honor our heritage as well as Christian beliefs.

CHOWANOKE NATION LAND PURCHASE

We have signed the papers and are now proud owners of Tribal Property on Highway 13 approximately 1.5 miles north of Pleasant Plains baptist Church.

 

CULTURE

The Chowanoke people were the largest and most powerful Algonquian tribe in present-day North Carolina, occupying the coastal banks of the Chowan River. They developed a culture that was rich in music and history. 


Music was fundamental to the culture of the Algonquins. The major events in a person’s life, annual celebrations, and religious practices all were associated with ceremonies and festivities. These ceremonies would involve music, in which drums and
singing were often integrated.


Dancing was also heavily linked to the musical culture of the Chowanoke, for them music and dance were inseparable. There were a number of dances with music that were associated with different rituals and ceremonies. Each of these dances had different expressions, qualities, and meanings. 

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Chowanoke Indian Culture

"Language may be forgotten, and the traditional ways of the past may be lost forever, but the universal language that always remains is that of music."

 

MOMENTS IN TIME

CHOWANOKE TRIBAL MEMBERS AND DESCENDANTS

These photographs are not to be copied or used in any way or form without the explicit permission of the Chowanoke Indian Nation and individual tribal members.

Chief Lewis and Father
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CONTACT US

Please use the contact form for general information and inquiries about the Chowanoke Indian Nation or to leave website feedback.

P.O. BOX S Winton, North Carolina 27986

(252) 301-6081

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©2017 by Chowanoke Indian Nation.